Pumpkin Pie


I went traditional for Thanksgiving this year with a Pumpkin Pie. Of course, it was not all that traditional since it was completely eggless and dairy-free. Plus it tasted blissfully good and it was cruelty-free and it rounded out Thanksgiving at my house quite nicely, thank you.

I used tofu as an egg substitute in my pumpkin pie and it created a texture that was supremely silky. Trust me, once you try this vegan pumpkin pie, you’ll never want to go back to the unhealthy one you were used to.

I’m just going to get on with the recipe now. For a great variation on a pumpkin dessert, be sure to check out my Pumpkin Cheesecake.

Enjoy, all!

Vegan Pumpkin Pie

For crust:

1 1/4 cups all-purpose flour (try to use unbleached)

1 tsp sugar

4 tbsp vegan “butter” or margarine

4 tbsp transfat-free shortening (or vanaspati)

1/4 tsp salt

Ice-cold water

Mix the flour, sugar and salt. Then, using a fork, cut the butter and shortening into the flour mixture until you have balls of fat no larger than peas.

Drizzle ice-cold water over the flour, 1 tbsp at a time, stirring with the fork, until the dough starts to come together. Once it holds together, turn it onto a lightly floured platform, shape into a disc, and wrap tightly in plastic wrap. Refrigerate for at least 30 minutes.

To roll the pie dough, remove it from the plastic wrap and roll into a disc large enough to fit over a 9-inch pie plate with some overhang. Transfer the dough to the pie plate and crimp the edges to make a decorative border. The easiest way to do this, if you’re not used to it, is to take a fork and press all around the edge in a decorative pattern.

Now you need to blind bake the crust. What this means is baking the crust without the filling. But placing a crust by itself in the oven causes it to shrink, so take a piece of aluminum foil and smooth it over the crust, making sure you push it against the sides and bottom of the crust. Let a little bit of foil hang over the edge so the edge will not brown too fast.

Now fill the crust with uncooked rice or uncooked beans (these act as weights to keep your crust in place), making sure you fill all the way to the top. I have a box of rice that I use again and again to blind-bake crusts– after I am done, I just store it until I need it the next time. Do not cook the rice or beans that you use to blind bake.

Place the pie pan, rice or beans and all, into a 400-degree preheated oven and bake for 20 minutes.

Remove from the oven and carefully lift off the foil and the weights. Now pierce the crust all over with a fork and return it to the oven for 5 more minutes until it is lightly golden-brown.

Remove.

For the filling:

1 15-ounce can of pumpkin puree

1 12-oz package silken tofu

3/4 cup vanilla soymilk

3/4 cup sugar + 2 tbsp molasses (just use dark brown sugar if you don’t have molasses)

2 tsp ground cinnamon

1/2 tsp ground cardamom

1/4 tsp ground cloves

1/2 tsp salt

Whisk all the ingredients together in a large bowl or in a food processor (the way I did it).

Pour the pie filling into a warm crust and bake in a preheated 375-degree oven for 45-50 minutes or until the filling is set but slightly quavery. Remove the pie to a rack and cool completely before serving.

Have a great weekend, everyone!

(C) All recipes and photographs copyright of Holy Cow! Vegan Recipes.

Comments

  1. April says

    I can’t wait to try this! I know you’re a cheesecake fan, and I wanted to ask if you could try my recipe and see if you like it? I just posted it to my blog, “Veggie Mania”. I just started it, and you are my inspiration!

  2. DJ Karma says

    Your crust looks so good and flakey! I’m all “pumpkined” out for now… I think I made 4 or 5 pies last month LOL! Great looking recipe for future pies though.

  3. Maya Varadan says

    Looks Inviting.Vaishali,I have a few clarifications .It might not relate to this post.Just curious if you had made any analysis on the aluminium foil and edible silver foils(varak).I always hit in to controversy ,that both consume some amount of animal product during the making process or by itself contains some traces of animal residues.Appreciate your thoughts on this.Thanks in advance

  4. Vaishali says

    April, thanks. I think you have a great blog– congratulations and keep blogging!

    DJ– It sure is easy to get pumpkined out this time of year :)

    Trinity, Pavani, Priya, Parita, Usha, Zengirl, Divya, Shri, Nithya: Thanks!

    Maya: You’re absolutely right. Silver and gold vark are hammered out between layers of animal hide and cannot be considered vegan or even vegetarian. I’m glad you brought it up.

  5. Tibik says

    These are pie making 101 questions. What kind of a pie pan do you recommend? glass? metal? Do you need to grease and flour the pie pan before you put the pie crust in? Do you think I can use all Earth Balance(sticks)instead of the Margarine and shortening combination.
    Thank you again for blogging and sharing. I constantly use it as a recipe source.
    Thanks
    Tibik

  6. Vaishali says

    Samarpita, sorry for the late reply– yes, you can use only vanaspati instead of a combination.

    Tibik, I use a glass pan– I have a regular-sized one (a 9-inch pan which I used for this recipe) and a deep-dish with a fluted edge that I usually use for fruit pies, like apple pie. I like the glass pans– I used to have a metal one that got scraped and rusted eventually, and I find it easier to get the pies out of the glass pans.
    You don’t need to grease and flour the pie pan because there’s plenty of grease in your crust.
    You can definitely use Earth Balance only, but the shortening always makes for a flakier crust. That’s because shortening, unlike butter and butter substitutes, remains solid even at room temperature and doesn’t melt into the flour the way butter and butter subs would. When you put your pie crust into the oven, the shortening melts, creating air pockets that make the crust flaky. If you do go with Earth Balance only, I’d recommend ensuring that you keep it really cold at all times, and work in a cold atmosphere. Also, don’t handle the dough much– use a fork as much as possible.
    Hope that helps. :)

  7. JABS says

    I usually turn to you when I have baking to do because your recipes are always delicious. Therefore, this is where I have started my search for a Thanksgiving pumpkin pie recipe. However, my problem is this: I don’t like desserts with a silken tofu base. I just really dislike its taste. Do you have any thoughts on what my other options might be? Is there any way I can take my mom’s recipe (really, the one on the back of the can of Libby’s pumpkin) and make it vegan without large amounts of silken tofu? It’s possible I’m asking for the impossible here. :)

    • Vaishali says

      Hi Jabs, Happy Thanksgiving! You might want to try doubling the soymilk and adding some egg replacer to thicken the custard– I’d guess the equivalent of two eggs would work. I’d also suggest testing it first, before doing your final Thanksgiving baking.

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