Buckwheat Waffles

Vegan Buckwheat Waffles
I love trying out new ways to make waffles and pancakes, and these buckwheat waffles are a delicious variation on my no-egg waffle recipe.

Buckwheat is not related to wheat– it’s actually a seed, and it’s terribly nutritious. You can read more about it here.

I mix up the buckwheat with a lighter flour– you can use whole-wheat pastry flour or just regular all-purpose– and they turn out just perfect: crispy on the outside and tender on the inside. These waffles are really low-fat: there’s just 2 tbsp of canola oil in the recipe and it makes 8 waffles in my waffle-maker.

Eat these with maple syrup, my favorite way to have them, or top them with some fruit and vegan whipped cream for a very special breakfast.

Here’s the recipe. Enjoy, everyone!

Vegan Buckwheat Waffles
Buckwheat Waffles
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Author:
Recipe type: Breakfast
Serves: 8 waffles
Ingredients
  • Dry ingredients:
  • ¾ cup buckwheat flour
  • 1 cup whole wheat pastry flour or all-purpose flour
  • 1 tbsp baking powder
  • 1 tbsp sugar
  • ¼ tsp salt
  • Whisk these together in a bowl and set aside.
  • Wet ingredients:
  • 1½ cups soy milk
  • 1½ tsp egg replacer like EnerG whisked into 2 tbsp warm water
  • ½ cup apple sauce
  • 2 tbsp canola oil
Instructions
  1. Whisk the wet ingredients together and add to the dry ingredients. Mix together but let some lumps remain.
  2. Heat a waffle iron and spray lightly with oil. Make waffles per instructions.
(C) All recipes and photographs copyright of Holy Cow! Vegan Recipes.

St. Waffles: Whole-wheat Breakfast Goodness

I know, I know, it’s a weird name for waffles. But, trust me, these are so crammed with delicious goodness, they really do deserve to be sainted AND given an extra-bright halo.
Vegan wholegrain waffles
My waffle and pancake recipes are always healthy because I make them with wholegrain flours. These too were made with whole wheat pastry flour, but I also added a good bit of wheat germ and flax meal to the batter, boosting the fiber and healthy-fats content (I do love those healthy fats because they’re great for your brain and your skin. How good is that?)

Then, to boost the protein, I added a few dollops of tofu.

I love using tofu in dishes where no one can detect it. While both Desi and I like tofu, I know some people would rather kill than eat it. But tofu offers immense nutritional benefits and a complete, healthy vegetable protein, so it’s a shame to leave it out of any diet, vegan or not.

These waffles are really crispy and taste best right off the waffle iron (they do tend to harden up if left standing for too long, although they are still delicious).

If you don’t have a waffle iron, you might try adding more soymilk to the batter to make it thinner, and then make pancakes with it. In fact, I do this all the time: use waffle batter to make pancakes and vice-versa.

Serve these waffles with maple syrup and berries or bananas or with just a dusting of powdered sugar, if you have a less-than-sweet tooth. No matter how you eat them, these waffles will likely make you feel a little saintly yourself!

Wholegrain Waffles with Flax and Wheat Germ
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Author:
Recipe type: Breakfast
Serves: Eight waffles
Ingredients
  • 1 cup whole-wheat pastry flour
  • ¼ cup wheat germ, toasted lightly
  • ¼ cup flax meal
  • 1 tbsp baking powder
  • ¼ tsp salt
  • 2 tbsp sugar
  • In another bowl, mix together:
  • 1 cup silken tofu, beaten
  • 2-4 tbsp canola oil
  • 1 cup soy milk
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract (optional)
Instructions
  1. Add the tofu-soy milk mixture to the flour mixture and gently, with a spatula, mix until the dry ingredients are just moistened.
  2. If the mixture is too dry, add some more soy milk so you have a thick but spreadable batter.
  3. Heat a waffle iron and bake waffles according to instructions. My stone-age waffle-maker takes about ¼ cup of batter for each waffle and has a little green light that goes on when the waffle is ready to be removed and devoured mindlessly.

(C) All recipes and photographs copyright of Holy Cow! Vegan Recipes.

Eggless French Toast

Vegan French Toast, eggless and dairy-free

Even if the nationwide salmonella outbreak from contaminated eggs hasn’t actually made you sick, the horror stories that have emerged from the farms that produced these eggs have surely made you want to throw up your omelet?

The ongoing, nationwide recall of more than half-billion eggs has given us more evidence than we should possibly need that eggs hurt– both the humans who consume them and the hens who are forced to produce them like machines while living in conditions no sentient creature should ever have to endure. Federal investigators this week found the henhouses in the two farms where the salmonella-tainted eggs originated, Wright County Egg and Hillandale Farms, were stacked with eight-feet-high piles of manure, and crawling with rats and flies and maggots that “crunched under foot.”

It’s a pretty safe bet that conditions at egg farms around the world are no different. Worse, hens at these farms go through immense suffering that has been observed and chronicled by organizations like the Humane Society of the United States:

Like birds raised for meat, chickens in the egg industry suffer immensely—beginning right after birth. Male chicks are considered byproducts, as they’re unable to lay eggs and aren’t bred for meat production. Millions each year are gassed, crushed, or thrown into garbage bins to die from dehydration or asphyxiation. Most female chicks are painfully mutilated without any anesthesia. The tips of their sensitive beaks are sliced off with a hot blade, making it difficult for them to grasp food…

More than 95 percent of hens in U.S. factory farms are intensively confined in small, wire “battery cages,” stacked several tiers high and extending down long warehouses. Hens are given less space than the area of a letter-sized sheet of paper in which to eat, sleep, lay eggs, and defecate…After two years, the hens are no longer profitable and are ripped from the cages, limbs often tearing, as teams work at an hourly rate of up to1,500 birds, sometimes holding seven hens at a time. As with broiler chickens and turkeys, egg-laying hens are crammed in crates stacked on transport trucks and denied food, water, or protection from extreme temperatures during their journey to slaughter.

At the slaughter plant, the birds are dumped onto conveyors and hung upside down in shackles by their legs. In the United States, federal regulations do not require birds to be rendered unconscious before they are slaughtered… Birds have their throats cut by hand or machine. As slaughter lines run at rapid speeds (up to 8,400 chickens per hour), mistakes are common and some birds are still conscious as they enter tanks of scalding water intended to loosen their feathers.

Does that sound like a horror story? It is, a very real one at that, and who in their right heads would want any part of it?

If all that still isn’t enough, and if you still actually believe eggs are good for you, chew on this: a single egg contains more than 200 milligrams of cholesterol– that’s more cholesterol than you’ll find in a McDonald’s Angus Beef Burger or in a KFC Double Down sandwich or, in fact, in almost any disgusting fast-food menu item out there.

Doesn’t sound healthy to me.

Whether you’re a vegan or not, eggs are by far one of the easiest foods to replace in your diet. Look at my vegan substitutes page for ideas on how to bake, cook and eat egglessly and healthfully and — big bonus– minus that absolutely yucky eggy stink.

And now, so I can put my egg substitute where my mouth is, here’s my completely eggless French Toast recipe which would convert the hardiest egg aficionado. It’s not just delicious, but it is actually good for you.

Enjoy!

Vegan French Toast, eggless and dairy-free
Eggless French Toast
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Author:
Recipe type: Breakfast, Brunch
Serves: 5
Ingredients
  • 5 slices wholegrain bread (use a mild-flavored grain, like wheat–  not rye or sourdough, unless you actually happen to like your French toast with those breads)
  • 1 cup soymilk
  • ¼ cup whole-wheat flour
  • 1 tbsp maple syrup or agave nectar
  • 2 tbsp flaxseed meal
  • 1 tsp pure vanilla extract
  • ½ cup walnuts, finely crushed (optional)
  • Oil to coat skillet or griddle in a thin layer
Instructions
  1. Place all ingredients except the bread, walnuts and oil in a shallow container and mix well.
  2. Place the walnuts in a separate dish
  3. Dip the slices of bread one by one in the batter and coat on either side. I let them soak about 20-30 seconds on each side.
  4. Dip into the walnuts
  5. Heat a skillet and coat with a thin layer of oil
  6. Place a slice of the French toast on the skillet and cook on each side until golden brown.
  7. Serve hot with a drizzle of maple syrup or agave nectar

For more eggless recipes, check out my Whole-Wheat Challah Bread, one of the most popular recipes on this blog, or my pancake, waffle cake and cookie recipes that use absolutely no eggs.
**
Update: I was thinking of including this in my original post because I knew someone would inevitably raise it: that vegetables like spinach and tomato have also been recalled for salmonella contamination in the past. It’s like that ultimate argument weapon in a meat- or egg-eater’s arsenal.

Unfortunately for them, though, I do have an answer: It’s  the meat, stupid (that’s not original, by the way, but I just couldn’t resist it!) 

Salmonella are intestinal bacteria that grow and flourish in animal intestines. Since vegetables don’t have an intestine, the reason they get contaminated is because germs from chicken and cow feces in animal farms contaminate waterways used for irrigating vegetables. It’s been proven time and again in federal and state investigations of these salmonella outbreaks.

The bottomline is this: animal farming is what causes salmonella. And stopping animal farming and giving up animal products is the only way to stop future infections of anything we put into our mouths.

Let’s all  toast to that!

(C) All recipes and photographs copyright of Holy Cow! Vegan Recipes.

Wholegrain Tofu Pancakes

Vegan Wholegrain Pancakes
Okay, so I am guilty of posting many, many pancake recipes, but what can I say? I get out of bed every weekend, dreaming of a stack of steaming pancakes that I can eat without feeling awful a minute after I have.

I hit the jackpot with these. My very vegan Wholegrain Tofu Pancakes are among the most guilt-free I’ve ever cooked up. They are made, like all my pancake recipes, with whole wheat pastry flour, and I added tofu to them instead of the sour cream that I would have in the past. So not only did I take away a fat-filled, zero-nutrition product, but I replaced it with a healthy, lean and protein-filled one. With no compromise whatsoever in the taste. I could hug myself!

The lime (you can use lemon) in the pancakes gives them a tang that goes perfectly with the heavy sweetness of my favorite pancake topping, maple syrup.

It’s Friday night, and I want to get away and have some fun, so I’ll get on with the recipe. Do try them this weekend. You won’t regret them, and neither will your waistline!

Wholegrain vegan pancakes

 

Wholegrain Tofu Pancakes
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Author:
Recipe type: Breakfast
Serves: 8
Ingredients
  • Whisk together in one bowl:
  • 1 cup whole wheat pastry flour
  • 2 tbsp sugar
  • ½ tsp baking soda
  • ¼ tsp salt
  • In another bowl, mix together:
  • 1 cup silken tofu
  • ⅓ cup almond or soy milk
  • 4 tbsp lemon or lime juice
  • 2 tsp lemon or lime zest (optional)
  • 2 tbsp canola or vegetable oil
  • 2 tsp vanilla
Instructions
  1. Pour the wet ingredients into the dry ingredients and stir together in as few strokes as possible until just mixed. The batter should be lumpy, not smooth.
  2. Pour ¼ cup of the batter on a hot non-stick or cast-iron griddle coated with oil. This is a very thick, almost cakey batter, so you might have to give it a nudge with your ladle to help it spread.
  3. Cook until bubbles appear on the top of the pancake and the bottom is golden-brown. Flip over and cook until golden on the other side.
  4. Serve hot with maple syrup or any other topping of your choice.

(C) All recipes and photographs copyright of Holy Cow! Vegan Recipes.

Lemony Vegan Pancakes

Lemon Pancakes, vegan
I make pancakes very, very often because they are a favorite breakfast food of Desi’s and also of my doggies who cannot get enough of the under-the-table handouts he sneaks out to them. I think it’s quite flattering – and promising- that these canines love pancakes that have no animal products in them whatsoever.To keep my pancakes healthy and to make them more interesting, I often tweak my basic recipe, sometimes to incorporate different healthy flours, and sometimes with additions like bananas or blueberries.

This past weekend, I decided to haul out a bag of soy flour that had been sitting in my pantry for longer than I care to admit. While at it, I looked around for what else I might have that might make for an interesting and nutritious pancake.

Let me confess: when it comes to cooking, I am not the ultimate perfectionist who runs to the grocery store for that last, tiny, perfect ingredient. Instead, I am more of a let’s-experiment-with-what-I’ve-got-on-hand kind of a gal. And when I found some frozen corn and some very nice wholegrain corn flour (not corn meal- the corn flour is finer) I knew I had the beginnings of a very fine breakfast.

I also had in my pantry some lemon extract that I’d picked up on sale with no idea what to do with it, and I decided to use it to flavor my pancakes, instead of vanilla which I’d have normally used.

My Lemony Pancakes surpassed my expectations. They were delicious and the lemony fragrance and kernels of whole corn made for a delightful surprise in every bite.

This is one recipe that I know is going to be a hot breakfast favorite at our home. What’s more, it even passed the doggie test!

Lemon Pancakes
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Author:
Recipe type: Breakfast
Serves: 8
Ingredients
  • Dry ingredients:
  • Mix together:
  • ½ cup soy flour
  • ½ cup wholegrain cornflour
  • ½ cup whole-wheat pastry flour
  • 1½ tsp baking powder
  • 3 tbsp sugar (I use turbinado but regular or vegan sugar is fine)
  • ¼ tsp salt (optional)
  • Wet ingredients:
  • Mix together well:
  • 1⅓ cup almond milk (can substitute with soy)
  • 1 tbsp ground flaxseed mixed well with 6 tbsp water
  • 2 tsp lemon extract
  • 3 tbsp canola oil
  • ½ cup frozen corn kernels (leave them out at room temperature for around five minutes before adding)
Instructions
  1. Make a well in the bowl of dry ingredients and pour in the almond-milk-flaxseed mixture. Mix with just a few strokes until the wet ingredients are just moistened. The batter should be lumpy.
  2. On a very hot iron skillet, spray some oil or smear a light film.
  3. Pour ¼ cup of the batter on the skillet. It will spread into a round. If it needs some help spreading, just nudge it slightly with the bottom of the cup.
  4. Cook until bubbles appear in the center and the sides are slightly dry. Lift a corner gently with a spatula and if the pancake is golden-brown underneath, flip over and cook the other side for another minute or so.
  5. This batter is thick, so remember to cook both sides thoroughly so that you are not surprised by raw batter smack in the middle of your pancake as you’re eating it. If you are not sure, you can poke the underside of the pancake with a fork while it is still on the skillet. If batter runs out, you need a few more seconds of cooking.
  6. Enjoy with warm maple syrup or any topping of your choice. Tip: Blueberries go great with the lemony tang of these pancakes.
I”d like to send this on to Sia of that lovely blog Monsoon Spice who is showcasing soy at JFI this month. JFI, or Jihva for Ingredients, was started by Indira of Mahanandi.


***

Yikes! There’s a critter behind the curtain!

(C) All recipes and photographs copyright of Holy Cow! Vegan Recipes.